Legal Term Dictionary

Search our free database of thousands of legal terms. The easiest-to-read, most user-friendly guide to legal terms.
This dictionary is from the early 20th century and is not to be construed as legal advice.
Search
 
  • A DATU
    L. Lat. From the date. Hatha v. Ash, 2 Salk. 413. A die datus, from the day of the date. Id.; 2 Crabb, Real Prop. p. 248, i 1301; Hatter v. Ash, 1 Ld. Rayin. 84. A dato from the date. Cro. Jac. 135. A digniori fieri debet denominatio. Denomination More...
  • A FORFAIT ET SANS GARANTIE
    In French law. A formula used in indorsing commercial paper, and equivalent to "without recourse."
  • A FORTIORI
    By a stronger reason. A term used in logic to denote an argument to the effect that because one ascertained fact exists, therefore another, which is included in it. or analogous to it and which is less improbable, unusual, or surprising, must also exist.
  • A GRATIA
    From grace or favor; as a matter of indulgence, not of right.
  • A LATERE
    Lat. From the side. In connection with the succession to property, the term means "collateral." Bract, fol. 206. Also, sometimes, "without right" Id. fol. 429. In ecclesiastical law, a legate a latere is one invested with full apostolic powers; one authorized to represent the pope as if the latter were More...
  • A LIBELLIS
    L. Lat. An officer who had charge of the libelli or petitions addressed to the sovereign. Calvin. A name sometimes given to a chancellor, (cancellarius,) in the early history of that office. Spelman, "Cancellarius"
  • A 1'IMPOSSIBLE NUL N'EST TENU
    No one is bound to do what is impossible.
  • A ME
    (Lat. ego, I.) A term denoting direct tenure of the superior lord. 2 Bell, II. L. Sc. 133. Unjustly detaining from me. He is said to withhold a me (from me) who has obtained possession of my property unjustly. Calvin.
  • A MENSA ET THORO
    From bed and board. Descriptive of a limited divorce or separation by judicial sentence.
  • A NATIVITATE
    From birth, or from infancy. Denotes that a disability, status, etc., is congenital. A non posse ad non esse sequitur argumentum necessarie negative. From the impossibility of a thing to its non-existence, the inference follows necessarily in the negative. That which cannot be done is not done. Hob. 3306. Otherwise, More...
Showing 20 of 14636